Pakeezah

Pakeezah

Album Category: Hindi, Film
Year: 1972
Music Director: Ghulam Mohammed, Naushad
Lyricist: Kaif Bhopali, Traditional, Majrooh Sultanpuri, Kaifi Azmi, Kamal Amrohi
Label: H.M.V.
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Album Credits: MUSIC ASSISTANT: Mohammed Ibrahim. SONGS RECORDED BY: Minoo Katrak, Robin Chatterjee. TITLE & BACKGROUND MUSIC: Naushad. BACKGROUND MUSIC ASSISTANT: Mohammed Shafi.
 
Film Credits: DIRECTOR: Kamal Amrohi. PRODUCER: Kamal Amrohi. WRITER: Kamal Amrohi. ACTOR: Ashok Kumar, More...
 



Song Listing


 
Title Music
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Music Director: Naushad
Genre: Sugam
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Inhi Logon Ne Le Leena Dupatta Mera
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Music Director: Ghulam Mohammed
Lyricist: Majrooh Sultanpuri
Genre: Filmi, Hindi Folk
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Najariya Ki Maari
Singer: Rajkumari
Music Director: Naushad
Lyricist: Traditional
Genre: Sugam, Hindi Folk
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Chalo Dildar Chalo
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar, Mohammed Rafi
Music Director: Ghulam Mohammed
Lyricist: Kaif Bhopali
Genre: Filmi, Sugam
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Aaj Kaun Gali Gayo Shyam
Singer: Parveen Sultana
Music Director: Naushad
Lyricist: Traditional
Genre: Hindustani
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Teer-E-Nazar Dekhenge
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Music Director: Ghulam Mohammed
Lyricist: Kaif Bhopali
Genre: Filmi, Ghazal, Sugam
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Thaade Rahiyo O Baanke Yaar
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Music Director: Ghulam Mohammed
Lyricist: Majrooh Sultanpuri
Genre: Sugam, Hindustani, Rajasthani Folk
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Mausam Hai Aashiqana
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Music Director: Ghulam Mohammed
Lyricist: Kamal Amrohi
Genre: Filmi, Sugam
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Mora Saajan Sautan Ghar Jaaye
Singer: Vani Jayaram
Music Director: Naushad
Lyricist: Traditional
Genre: Hindustani
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Chalte Chalte Yun Hi Koi Mil Gaya Tha
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Music Director: Ghulam Mohammed
Lyricist: Kaifi Azmi
Genre: Filmi, Sugam, Ghazal
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Awards


 
  • No award information available.

Trivia


 

    Album

  • While work on this film started in 1956, it was only released in February 1972. Among the things that delayed the film was the marital discord between the film's director Kamal Amrohi and his wife Meena Kumari, who was the film's heroine. The film was almost shelved when the couple separated in 1964. While they remained separated, they eventually reconciled in 1969 and resumed work on the film. At that time, Meena Kumari was battling with cirrhosis of the liver caused by her alcoholism. She was very ill during the final months of the film's production, and Amrohi had to make several compromises to accommodate her condition. This included the use of body doubles in several scenes, using long shots in some scenes and not focussing on her face in some. Meena Kumari died soon after the film's release. One last film of hers - "Gomti Ke Kinare" (1972) - was released after her death.[1][2][MR10]
  • This film took many years to complete. The original music director Ghulam Mohammed passed away during this period, and Naushad was brought in to complete the film's remaining songs and background score. When Kamal Amrohi was asked by the film's financiers to change the film's music to make it more contemporary, the filmmaker said that he would have considered it if Ghulam Mohammed were alive, but since the music director was no more, changing the film's music was out of the question.[3][4]
  • Ashok Kumar was cast in the film's lead role when it was launched. However, as years passed, Ashok Kumar was given a different role in the film and was replaced by Dharmendra. Still later, Dharmendra opted out of the film to defuse the rumours floating around about his "affair" with Meena Kumari. It was only then that Raaj Kumar signed up to play the film's lead role.[5]
  • Ghulam Mohammed had recorded nine songs for this film that had remained unused. These songs, including a faster-paced version of "Chalo Dildar Chalo", were released separately in 1977 in an album titled "Pakeezah Rang Barang".[6]
  • The film's editor, D.N. Pai, had planned to remove a shot in the film's climax of a young courtesan watching the baraat of Meena Kumari's character leaving the kotha. However, filmmaker Kamal Amrohi had insisted on retaining the shot as it was this courtesan that he considered the character truly representing the film's title. Amrohi's decision was redeemed when, after the film's release, he received a letter from a young moviegoer requesting for a still of the shot of the girl who, according to him, played the film's titular role.[7]
  • Louis Banks decided to stop working as a music arranger in films when he was not credited for his work in this film. He focussed on working as an instrumentalist in the following years but did get back to arranging music eventually.[8]
  • This was the last film of Josef Wirsching, the cinematographer of German origin who had been part of the Hindi film industry since the mid-1930s. He passed away in 1967 before he could complete his first colour film. Director Kamal Amrohi had to bring in other cinematographers to complete the film.
  • Kamal Amrohi had rented Cinemascope lens from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) on a royalty basis to shoot this film. When Amrohi discovered an obscure focussing error in the prints during the film's post-production and informed MGM about it, the company waived the royalty fees for the Cinemascope lens and gave it to him as a gift.[9]
  • Pran refused to accept the Filmfare Award for Best Supporting Actor for the film "Be-Imaan" (1972) as a mark of protest against Filmfare's decision to give the Best Music Director award to Shankar - Jaikishan for "Be-Imaan" (1972). The actor, like many others in the film industry, believed that Ghulam Mohammed was more deserving of the Best Music director award for this film.[10]
  • While some of the songs in this film were released in 1971 in EP records, the complete album was only released in 1972 as an LP.

    Song

  • Inhi Logon Ne Le Leena Dupatta Mera - This song probably had folk origins. There were at least two other versions of this song in earlier Hindi films - one in "Himmat" (1941) and another in "Aabroo" (1943).[11][12]
  • Najariya Ki Maari - Naushad was taken aback to see the famous yesteryear singer Rajkumari amongst the chorus singers while recording this film's background score. Seeing that she had fallen on hard times, Naushad decided to help her by giving her this solo song. Rajkumari sang one last Hindi film song after this before retiring - "Hari Din To Beeta Shaam Hui" ("Kitaab", 1977).[13]
  • Teer-E-Nazar Dekhenge - Since Meena Kumari was very unwell while shooting this song, Padma Khanna doubled for her and performed the dance in it. The use of a body double in the song was camouflaged with a combination of a veil covering Padma Khanna's face and the use of long shots.
  • Thaade Rahiyo O Baanke Yaar - While the song itself was written by Majrooh Sultanpuri, its opening lines were written by producer, director Kamal Amrohi himself.
  • Mausam Hai Aashiqana - This was the first song Kamal Amrohi shot when work on the film resumed in 1969. To cover up Meena Kumari's bloated stomach - the effect of liver cirrhosis - Amrohi had the actress wear a lungi and kurta.[14]
  • Chalte Chalte Yun Hi Koi Mil Gaya Tha - Pandit Ram Narayan, who played the sarangi in this song, required several retakes to perfect his contribution to the song.



References


 

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