Satte Pe Satta

Satte Pe Satta

Album Category: Hindi, Film
Year: 1982
Music Director: R.D. Burman
Lyricist: Gulshan Bawra
Label: Polydor
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Film Credits: DIRECTOR: Raj N. Sippy. PRODUCER: Romu N. Sippy. STORY: Jyoti Swaroop. SCREENPLAY: Jyoti Swaroop, More...
 



Song Listing


 
Dukki Pe Dukki Ho
Singer: R.D. Burman, Kishore Kumar, Asha Bhosle, Bhupinder Singh, Sapan Chakraborty, Basu Chakraborty
Music Director: R.D. Burman
Lyricist: Gulshan Bawra
Genre: Filmi
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Jhuka Ke Sar Ko Poochho
Singer: Asha Bhosle, Sapan Chakraborty, Anand Kumar C.
Music Director: R.D. Burman
Lyricist: Gulshan Bawra
Genre: Filmi, Pop
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Dilbar Mere Kab Tak Mujhe
Singer: Kishore Kumar, Annette Pinto
Music Director: R.D. Burman
Lyricist: Gulshan Bawra
Genre: Filmi
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Zindagi Milke Bitayenge (Happy)
Singer: R.D. Burman, Kishore Kumar, Sapan Chakraborty, Bhupinder Singh
Music Director: R.D. Burman
Lyricist: Gulshan Bawra
Genre: Filmi
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Mausam Mastana
Singer: Asha Bhosle, Dilraj Kaur
Music Director: R.D. Burman
Lyricist: Gulshan Bawra
Genre: Filmi
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Pyar Hamen Kis Mod Pe Le Aaya
Singer: R.D. Burman, Kishore Kumar, Gulshan Bawra, Sapan Chakraborty, Bhupinder Singh
Music Director: R.D. Burman
Lyricist: Gulshan Bawra
Genre: Filmi, Pop
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Pariyon Ka Mela Hai
Singer: Kishore Kumar, R.D. Burman, Annette Pinto, Sapan Chakraborty
Music Director: R.D. Burman
Lyricist: Gulshan Bawra
Genre: Filmi, Pop
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Zindagi Milke Bitayenge (Sad)
 
Singer: Kishore Kumar
Music Director: R.D. Burman
Lyricist: Gulshan Bawra
Genre: Filmi
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Awards


 
  • No award information available.

Trivia


 

    Album

  • This film was an adaptation of the American musical film "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" (1954) which in turn was based on the short story "The Sobbin' Women" written by Stephen Vincent Benet.
  • When Raj Sippy had approached Hema Malini for this film, she had told him that she was pregnant. Sippy did not have any issues with this and had brought her on board for the film. Her condition was concealed on the screen to an extent by shooting close-ups and mid-shots of her during the last months of her pregnancy. According to Hema Malini, the film's seven heroes, including Amitabh Bachchan, had been very protective of her during the film's shooting.[MR32]
  • The background score of this film has a great example of R.D. Burman's knack for experimentation. For the eerie music that serves as a motif for the villainous character of Babu, played by Amitabh Bachchan, R.D. Burman had singer Annette Pinto literally gargle the tune into the microphone.[MR2]
  • It is said that the famous scene in this film in which Amitabh Bachchan gets drunk was largely improvised by him and Amjad Khan. The two actors, who were good friends, were apparently only given a rough sketch for this scene.
  • The tune vocalised by Asha Bhosle in a scene in the climax of this film involving Amitabh Bachchan and Ranjeeta was reused for the mukhda of a song in another Raj Sippy film, "Deewane Do Dil Mile" ("Kudrat", 1998).[1]
  • Sachin, who played the role of the youngest brother in this film, loosely adapted the film for the Marathi movie "Amhi Satpute" (2008). He directed the Marathi film and played the lead role in it.
  • Amitabh Bachchan bought the house that he later named Jalsa from N.C. Sippy around the time this film was being produced. It has been reported that Bachchan's fee for this film was adjusted against the price of the house. It is this house where Amitabh Bachchan started giving an audience to his fans every Sunday at 6 pm. The scene in this film in which Amjad Khan gets Amitabh Bachchan drunk was shot in this house. A few scenes in N.C. Sippy's film "Chupke Chupke" (1975) were also shot in this house, including the title song featuring the house's future residents Amitabh Bachchan and Jaya Bhaduri![2][3]

    Song

  • Dilbar Mere Kab Tak Mujhe - This song was an adaptation of the 1967 hit single "Zigeunerjunge" by the German singer Alexandra.[4]
  • Zindagi Milke Bitayenge (Happy) - The tune of the mukhda of this song was adapted from the song "The Longest Day" written, composed and sung by Paul Anka, and arranged by Maurice Jarre for the war film "The Longest Day" (1962). Paul Anka also had an acting role in the film. In fact, he was initially brought on board for the film only as an actor. The film's producer Darryl Zanuck had no plans to include any music in the film and had turned down several overtures by Anka in this regard. When Anka finally recorded the theme at his own expense, Zanuck had a change of heart and decided to include it in the film.[5]
  • Zindagi Milke Bitayenge (Happy) - R.D. Burman not only lent his voice to this song but also played the harmonica in it.
  • Mausam Mastana - It appears that R.D. Burman may have adapted the tune of this song for some portions of the song "Ae Mere Deewano Baat Meri Tum Maano" ("Gardish", 1993). A song composed by Kishore Kumar, "Chalta Chala Jaoon Main" ("Shabash Daddy", 1978), also had a similar tune. It is possible both these songs were inspired by some other song.[6][7]
  • Pyar Hamen Kis Mod Pe Le Aaya - R.D. Burman composed this song using the dummy line "Roop Tera Mastana Hoga Ri".[8]



References


 

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