Ae Dil Hai Mushkil

Ae Dil Hai Mushkil

Album Category: Hindi, Film
Year: 2016
Music Director: Pritam, Sohail Rana
Lyricist: Amitabh Bhattacharya, Faiyyaz Hashmi
Label: Sony Music
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Album Credits: BACKING VOCALS: Arjun Chandy, Keshia Braganza, Gwen Diaz, Neetu Bhalla, N.K. Deep Kaur, Bhabita, Geet, Ashwin, Himanshu, Akashdeep. MUSICIANS: Roland, More...
 
Film Credits: DIRECTOR: Karan Johar. PRODUCER: Hiroo Yash Johar, Karan Johar, Apoorva Mehta. STORY: Karan Johar. SCREENPLAY: Karan Johar. DIALOGUE: Niranjan Iyengar, More...
 
(2) Reviews



Song Listing


 
Ae Dil Hai Mushkil (Tu Safar Mera)
Singer: Arijit Singh
Music Director: Pritam
Lyricist: Amitabh Bhattacharya
Genre: Filmi
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Raanjhan De Yaar Bulleya
Singer: Amit Mishra, Shilpa Rao
Music Director: Pritam
Lyricist: Amitabh Bhattacharya
Genre: Filmi, Sufi/Qawwali, Rock
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Channa Mereya
Singer: Arijit Singh
Music Director: Pritam
Lyricist: Amitabh Bhattacharya
Genre: Filmi
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The Breakup Song
Singer: Arijit Singh, Badshaah, Jonita Gandhi, Nakash Aziz
Music Director: Pritam
Lyricist: Amitabh Bhattacharya
Genre: Filmi, Pop
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Cutiepie
Singer: Nakash Aziz, Pradeep Singh Sran
Music Director: Pritam
Lyricist: Amitabh Bhattacharya
Genre: Filmi, Bhangra
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Ali Ali Ali Alizeh
Singer: Arijit Singh, Ash King, Shashwat Singh
Music Director: Pritam
Lyricist: Amitabh Bhattacharya
Genre: Pop, Filmi
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Raanjhan De Yaar Bulleya (Reprise)
Singer: Arijit Singh, Shilpa Rao
Music Director: Pritam
Lyricist: Amitabh Bhattacharya
Genre:
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Channa Mereya (Unplugged)
Singer: Arijit Singh
Music Director: Pritam
Lyricist: Amitabh Bhattacharya
Genre:
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Aaj Jane Ki Zid Naa Karo
Singer: Shilpa Rao
Music Director: Sohail Rana, Pritam
Lyricist: Faiyyaz Hashmi, Amitabh Bhattacharya
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Awards


 

Trivia


 

    Album

  • The film was caught up in the events following the Uri terrorist attack of September 18 2016 in which 18 Indian soldiers were killed. The relationship between India and Pakistan deteriorated after the attack and re-ignited debates about the involvement of Pakistani artists in Indian films. The makers of this film came under criticism since it featured Pakistani actors Fawad Khan and Imran Abbas. Workers of the political outfit MNS staged protests outside the office of Dharma Productions. The Cinema Owners and Exhibitors Association announced that its member theatres would not screen films featuring Pakistani actors, including this film. It was reported that director Karan Johar made a key change to the film due to the heightened sensitivities in the country. According to news reports, the characters of Anushka Sharma and Aishwarya Rai Bachchan were changed from Pakistanis to Indian Muslims. A truce was brokered between MNS and the film industry in a meeting called by the Maharashtra Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis. MNS's Raj Thackeray promised to not disrupt the screenings of films with Pakistani actors that were already in production. Karan Johar committed to including a slide in the film's opening that paid tribute to the Indian army. Additionally, The Producer Guild of India agreed to not sign Pakistani artists going forward. The film received mixed reviews but was a box office hit.[1][2][3][4]
  • The film featured a line that did not go down well with fans of the legendary Hindi film playback singer Mohammed Rafi. In a scene, Ranbir Kapoor's character says that people compare his voice with Mohammed Rafi's and Anushka Sharma's character responds "Mohammad Rafi? Woh gaate kam rote zyada the na?". Rafi's son Shahid Rafi demanded that director Karan Johar tender an apology and delete the line from the film. Other prominent people including singer Sonu Nigam also criticised this line. Interestingly, the film may have taken its title from a popular Rafi song from the film "C.I.D." (1956).[5][6]
  • Sony Music released a Deluxe Edition of the film's soundtrack to exploit the success of the film and its music. This album included three songs in addition to the six in the original soundtrack album - two version songs and a rendition of the popular ghazal "Aaj Jane Ki Zid Na Karo". The ghazal was used in the film's background score. An album with instrumental versions of the film's songs was also published after the film's release.
  • The makers of the film had licensed the title song of the film "An Evening In Paris" (1967) and even shot it for the film. The song sequence had featured Ranbir Kapoor and Anushka Sharma, with the actors choreographing their moves themselves. However, it appears that director Karan Johar was not satisfied with the result and did not include it in the film. Saregama released the song separately as a single and published the deleted song sequence on YouTube. The original song, composed by Shankar - Jaikishan, sung by Mohammed Rafi, and written by Hasrat Jaipuri, was used as-is.[7][8]

    Song

  • Ae Dil Hai Mushkil (Tu Safar Mera) - Pritam had composed two tune options for this song. He ended up repurposing the unused tune for the song "Tu Jo Mila To Ho Gaya Main Qabil" ("Bajrangi Bhaijaan", 2015).[9][10]
  • Ae Dil Hai Mushkil (Tu Safar Mera) - According to Pritam, lyricist Amitabh Bhattacharya had written this song during a car ride from Andheri to Karan Johar's office in Khar, Mumbai. Pritam had shared the tune with him at the beginning of the car ride and asked him to come up with the lyrics to go with it! Bhattacharya had been very unhappy to start with but had managed to deliver the lyrics by the time they reached Johar's office. The lyricist had found his lyrics for the song predictable but had let them be since Johar and Pritam liked them. The song and its lyrics became very popular and Bhattacharya concluded that predictable lyrics can sometimes make songs more accessible.[11][12]
  • The Breakup Song - In an interview, Amitabh Bhattacharya cited the usage of "baasi" and "jeevit" in this song as an example of his attempts to use words that appeared to be dropping out of popular use. The use of "keval jhaag" in the song "Bhaag DK Bose Aandhi Aayi" ("Delhi Belly", 2011) was another such instance. Bhattacharya said that he was inspired to do this by what Gulzar had said in an interview - that he had used words like "chimta" and "charkha" in "Chappa Chappa Charkha Chale" ("Maachis", 1996) in order to preserve words that seemed to be falling out of favour.[13][14][15]



References


 

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