Guide

Guide

Album Category: Hindi, Film
Year: 1965
Music Director: S.D. Burman, Traditional
Lyricist: Shailendra, Traditional
Label: H.M.V.
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Album Credits: MUSIC ASSISTANT: Rahul Dev Burman. MUSIC CONDUCTED BY: Manohari Singh, Basu Chakravarty. SONGS RECORDED BY: Kaushik.
 
Film Credits: DIRECTOR: Vijay Anand. PRODUCER: Dev Anand. STORY: R.K. Narayan. SCREENPLAY: Vijay Anand. DIALOGUE: Vijay Anand. ACTOR: Dev Anand, More...
 
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Song Listing


 
Gaata Rahe Mera Dil
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar, Kishore Kumar
Music Director: S.D. Burman
Lyricist: Shailendra
Genre: Filmi
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Wahan Kaun Hai Tera Musafir
Singer: S.D. Burman
Music Director: S.D. Burman
Lyricist: Shailendra
Genre: Filmi, Bengali Folk
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Piya Tose Naina Laage Re
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Music Director: S.D. Burman
Lyricist: Shailendra
Genre: Filmi, Sugam
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Din Dhal Jaye Haye Raat Na Jaye
Singer: Mohammed Rafi
Music Director: S.D. Burman
Lyricist: Shailendra
Genre: Filmi, Sugam
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Aaj Phir Jeene Ki Tamanna Hai
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Music Director: S.D. Burman
Lyricist: Shailendra
Genre: Filmi, Sugam
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Tere Mere Sapne Ab Ek Rang Hain
Singer: Mohammed Rafi
Music Director: S.D. Burman
Lyricist: Shailendra
Genre: Filmi, Sugam
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Mose Chhal Kiye Jaye Haay Re Haay Dekho Saiyan Beimaan
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Music Director: S.D. Burman
Lyricist: Shailendra
Genre: Filmi, Sugam, Hindustani
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Kya Se Kya Ho Gaya Bewafa Tere Pyar Mein
Singer: Mohammed Rafi
Music Director: S.D. Burman
Lyricist: Shailendra
Genre: Filmi
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Allah Megh De Paani De
Singer: S.D. Burman
Music Director: S.D. Burman
Lyricist: Shailendra
Genre: Bengali Folk
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Hey Ram
Singer: Manna Dey
Music Director: S.D. Burman, Traditional
Lyricist: Traditional
Genre: Bhajan
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Snake Dance Music
 
Music Director: S.D. Burman
Genre: Filmi
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Awards


 
  • No award information available.

Trivia


 

    Album

  • The film was an adaptation of R.K. Narayan's English novel "The Guide" (1958). It was conceived as an English language film before it was decided that it would be made in Hindi as well. The project took life when Dev Anand met American filmmaker Tad Danielewski during the 1962 Berlin Film Festival where "Hum Dono" (1961) was being screened. Danielewski asked Anand if they could collaborate on an English film based on an Indian novel. Anand suggested "The Guide", which had already been adapted for a Broadway play, even before he had procured its rights. He purchased the novel's rights from Narayan only after it was agreed that it would serve their purpose. The English and the Hindi versions of the film were kicked off at around the same time. The acclaimed American author Pearl S. Buck was to write the film's screenplay, Danielewski was to direct the English version, and Chetan Anand would direct the Hindi version. Buck also ended up coaching Waheeda Rehman on her English diction. The project was plagued by problems from the outset as the two directors didn't see eye to eye. The original plan was to shoot the two films together, with the scene for one film being shot after the other. Dev Anand concluded that this approach wouldn't work and that the films would be shot independently. He brought in Vijay Anand to replace Chetan Anand, who proceeded to make "Haqeeqat" (1964) instead. Vijay Anand came on board based on his agreement with Dev Anand that he would write the film's script from scratch. Consequently, the two films turned out to be completely different interpretations of the same literary material. The English version was around two hours long, featured no songs, played up the romance between Dev Anand and Waheeda Rehman's characters, and told the story linearly. The Hindi version was more than three hours long, featured several songs, treated the lead characters' romance conservatively, and used a flashback to tell its story. While the English version failed, the Hindi film went to become a hit after a slow beginning, which was attributed to the film's depiction of infidelity and a romantic relationship outside of marriage. R.K. Narayan himself did not approve of either screen adaptation. Specifically, he took issue with the filmmakers transporting the fictional, South Indian location of his story, Malgudi, to North India. The Hindi film, however, went on to win accolades and is considered an evergreen classic.[1][2][3]
  • While Waheeda Rehman's portrayal of Rosie in this film is considered among her best performances, her casting for the role was not a given. Dev Anand had initially considered Vyjayanthimala for the role but Tad Danielewski, the director of the film's English version, didn't want her since he considered her to be too voluptuous for it. Waheeda Rehman was then finalised for the role. Dev Anand had to pick the director of the Hindi version of the film next. His first choice was Raj Khosla. When Rehman found out about it, she threatened to walk out of the film. She didn't think she could work with Khosla again after the serious differences they have developed during the making of "Solva Saal" (1958). Dev gave in and brought in Chetan Anand instead of Khosla. This time it was Chetan who had a problem with Rehman. He apparently wanted to cast Priya Rajvansh in the film's lead role. However, Dev put his foot down since the role needed an actress who could dance and Rajvansh couldn't. The film was eventually made by Vijay Anand, who extracted a career-best performance from Waheeda Rehman.[4][5][MR54]
  • S.D. Burman fell very sick while composing music for this film. Dev Anand decided to wait for his favourite music director to recover instead of replacing him. Burman got better eventually and went on to compose some of his best music ever.[MR3]
  • Saira Banu was initially approached for the film's lead role. Tad Danielewski, the director of the film's English version, even met Banu in person to offer her the film. However, the actress declined the offer since she had committed dates to Mehboob Khan's "Habba Khatoon" opposite Dilip Kumar. It's another matter that "Habba Khatoon" was eventually shelved.[6]
  • This was the only film in which S.D. Burman sang two solos.
  • When this film lost the Filmfare Award for Best Music Director to Shankar - Jaikishan's "Suraj" (1966), it created a flutter in the industry and became a much-discussed topic in the years to come. S.D. Burman had reportedly been promised the award for this film for a sum of Rs. 50000 and had rejected the offer. Filmfare clarified later that the individuals who had approached Burman for the award were not connected to them in any way. Years later, when Shankar Singh Raghuvanshi called S.D. Burman to congratulate him for winning the Filmfare Award for Best Music Director for "Abhimaan" (1973), Burman thanked him and clarified that he had not spent any money on it![7][8][9][MR21]

    Song

  • Gaata Rahe Mera Dil - R.D. Burman contributed to this song composed by his father.[MR3]
  • Gaata Rahe Mera Dil - Dev and Vijay Anand had first approached lyricist Hasrat Jaipuri for this film. After being disappointed by the lyrics Hasrat offered, the brothers turned to Shailendra. Disappointed that he was their second choice, Shailendra quoted a fee that was considered very high at that time. The Anands agreed and Shailendra offered them the mukhda of this song by the time they left.[10]
  • Wahan Kaun Hai Tera Musafir - S.D. Burman had used the tune of this song earlier for his Bengali non-film song "Dur Kon Porobashe".[11]
  • Din Dhal Jaye Haye Raat Na Jaye - The first line of this song was actually written by Hasrat Jaipuri. When director Vijay Anand expressed his dissatisfaction with this line, Hasrat had an argument with him and walked out of the film. Shailendra was then brought in to replace Hasrat. Ironically, Shailendra chose to retain the contentious line that had led to Hasrat's exit from the film.[MR4]
  • Aaj Phir Jeene Ki Tamanna Hai - Dev Anand did not like this song when it was recorded. On the insistence of director Vijay Anand, they decided to shoot it and then determine if it should be retained. By the time the shoot ended, Dev Anand had changed his mind and agreed to keep the song in the film.[MR7]
  • Aaj Phir Jeene Ki Tamanna Hai - A significant portion of this song was shot at the Chittorgarh Fort in Rajasthan. A shot in the fort depicted Dev Anand's character spotting Waheeda Rehman's Rosie in a mirror while she dances in another part of the fort. This shot was inspired by the legend of Alauddin Khilji catching a glimpse of Rani Padmavati in a mirror in the same fort.
  • Aaj Phir Jeene Ki Tamanna Hai - The tune and lyrics of this song's mukhda appear to have inspired the hook line of the song "Aaj Phir Peene Ki Tamanna Hai" ("Loveshhuda", 2016).[12]
  • Mose Chhal Kiye Jaye Haay Re Haay Dekho Saiyan Beimaan - Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma played the tabla in this song. While he had started his career playing the tabla, Sharma had given up the instrument to focus on the santoor. It was R.D. Burman who convinced him to play the tabla for this song. Sharma did not play the tabla again for any other Hindi film song.[MR2]
  • Mose Chhal Kiye Jaye Haay Re Haay Dekho Saiyan Beimaan - This song may have been S.D. Burman's adaptation of a tune he had composed seven years earlier for the Hindi film song "Saiyan Kaise Dhaaroon Dheer" ("Sitaron Se Aage", 1958). "Saiyan Kaise Dhaaroon Dheer" itself had portions that may have been taken from "Chupke Chupke Rukte Rukte Maine Dekha Tune Dekha" ("Paying Guest", 1957).[13][14][MR10]
  • Kya Se Kya Ho Gaya Bewafa Tere Pyar Mein - This Mohammed Rafi solo came right after the Lata Mangeshkar solo, "Mose Chhal Kiye Jaye", in the film. Although the two songs had almost the same tune, the scales, arrangement, and tempo were so different that very few recognize the similarity between the songs.[MR10]
  • Allah Megh De Paani De - The tune and lyrics of the song's mukhda were adapted from a Bengali folk song by Abbasuddin Ahmed. Years later, Bappi Lahiri used the tune of the same song for the Hindi film song "De De Pyar De" ("Sharaabi", 1984).[15][16]



References


 

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